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Can I Apply Less Than The Recommended Dose Of Minoxidil?

We often get questions on the amount of minoxidil to use for each application. Liquid minoxidil is applied with a dropper and the recommended dose per application is 1ml, the liquid dropper is marked for exactly this amount. One of the  most common question we get is whether there is an issue applying more or less than the 1ml recommendation. The original research was standardized at 1ml, however, this was a somewhat arbitrary choice and only a guess as to what the average user would need. You can learn more about the reasoning behind using 1ml by viewing this video by Dr. Russell Knudsen, one of the five original minoxidil researchers. The important take away is that you should apply just enough to cover the affected areas. Those...

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Where Can Minoxidil Be Used?

  If you've purchased minoxidil before you've likely noticed that the box indicates minoxidil is effective only on the vertex/crown of the head. This is great if you are suffering from hair loss in this area, however, what if, like many of our clients, you are concerned about a receding hair line, hair loss in the temples or FPHL (Female Pattern Hair Loss)? Will minoxidil not work in these areas? Should it only be used on the crown of the head? To answer this question we have to look at the legalities behind claims a manufacturer can make as to the effectiveness of their products. For a manufacturer of any drug to be able to claim effectiveness, the manufacturer must perform...

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Rogaine Minoxidil Foam Vs. Rogaine Minoxidil Liquid

One of the most common questions we get is "which product should I use, minoxidil liquid or minoxidil foam?". It's a deceptively difficult question to answer well. The best answer that we can give you is it depends on your situation. Foam can be difficult to use for those with lots of hair, often, much of the foam ends up in the hair rather than on the scalp. Minoxidil left on the hair has no effect, it must penetrate the scalp to work effectively. Therefore, hair length, thickness and the location of the affected area is an important consideration. People with lots of hair often find liquid easier to get on the scalp, and avoid getting too much of it in...

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Finasteride in Canada: Avoiding Name Brands

Finasteride, as discussed in our article on the science of hair loss prevention, has been shown to prevent hair loss in up to 90% of people. It is one of two scientifically backed hair loss treatments. In Canada finasteride requires a prescription, typically your GP or dermatologist will provide you with this prescription if requested. Doctors normally prescribe the name brand product, Propecia. This is often expensive, ranging between $50 and $100/month and rarely covered by health insurance. Is there anyway to reduce the cost? A generic finasteride is available from most pharmacies, but you'll still be paying upwards of $50/month. A trick to save even more and possibly have your health insurance cover your prescription is to request Proscar....

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Why Laser Hair Loss Therapy Is Worth Considering

Each decade since the 1980s has brought with it a new hair loss therapy. In the 1980s it was minoxidil, in the 1990s it was oral DHT blockers (finasteride), and beginning in the 2000s low level laser therapy (LLLT) began to show promise in treating hair loss. First, let's differentiate LLLT from higher power lasers used in dermatologists offices. The wavelength used in low level laser therapy does not damage or burn the skin like high power lasers. There is no thermal effect, meaning only a very small amount of heat is generated, in contrast to high power lasers which use heat to cause their desired effect. LLLT never burns or damages the skin, it works by aiding energy production...

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